News

Every day LIN staff monitor hundreds of newspapers and broadcasters, dozens of listservs, web sites, government news sources, press releases and information supplied by our site users to bring you the latest and hottest in leisure, recreation, parks and healthy living. If you have relevant news or events you would like us to publicize, tell us about it.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Notification of Cessation of LIN Services

Added on Jun 6, 2017

Please distribute widely to your networks and share your thoughts in the comments below.

A Message from the LIN Board of Directors

To our users, partners, funders and sector colleagues,

We regret to inform you that after careful consideration, negotiation with sector partners and a variety of fundraising endeavours, the Leisure Information Network is no longer able to secure the funding needed to maintain and grow the National Recreation Database and our suite of information web resources.

As a result, LIN will wind down its operations ending September 30, 2017.

Our ability to remain active in the coming months is due to a financial contribution from the Interprovincial Sport and Recreation Council (ISRC). We thank them for this support which will also allow our web portals LIN.ca, ActiveAfterSchool.ca, Benefitshub.ca and Northernlinks.org to remain accessible until December 31, 2017.

For over 20 years LIN has been proud to serve as the steward for Canada’s recreation knowledge trust, but after a long period of dwindling financial support and the new reality of grants that support project work but not central operations, LIN is depleted and can no longer sustain and grow our communal dataset, or facilitate the national conversation.

But this conversation remains vital.

The ability to discover and share the kind of research, practical operational information and policy documentation in the National Recreation Database is key to a national conversation on recreation practice and standards, and is listed as a priority in the Framework for Recreation in Canada.It is our hope that the sector will rally together to find a way to ensure this data is not lost, and that the lines of communication remain open and engaged, though LIN is no longer in a financial position to support this work.

To this end we are creating a short survey to ask you, the practitioners, what knowledge development should look like in the recreation sector. This survey will be circulated in the coming weeks and we hope you can find some time in your busy schedules to share your thoughts. Your responses will be used in a final report to share with the sector in the hopes of supporting continued discourse about knowledge development the field of recreation and leisure.

If you have questions, ideas or support you can offer to help move this vision forward please contact us via Kerry Kelly, Executive Director, Leisure Information Network or post your thoughts in the comments below.

We thank you for your support of the Leisure Information Network over the years. It has been our pleasure to support your work in building a healthy active Canada.

Children Who Play Outdoors Are More Likely To Protect Nature As Adults

Added on Aug 22, 2017

A February 2017 University of British Columbia study demonstrates that children who play outside are more likely to cherish and protect nature when they become young adults. It found that 87 percent of those surveyed who played outside when they were young still held a love of nature into adulthood, and 84 percent of those young adults said taking care of the natural environment is a priority to them. The study found no significant differences in respondents coming from different social classes. 

Trevor Nace, Forbes

Parks Canada and Qikiqtani Inuit Association officially open Qausuittuq National Park

Added on Aug 11, 2017

Qausuittuq National Park, composed of a cluster of islands in the High Arctic has been a significant historical site for Inuit dating back 4,500 years. The National Park is a traditional hunting and fishing area that has sustained Inuit of Resolute Bay in the recent past. National parks represent the very best that Canada has to offer and tell stories of who we are, including the history, cultures and contributions of Inuit Peoples.

On August 10th, the Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Minister responsible for Parks Canada, Catherine McKenna, along with P.J. Akeeagok, President of the Qikiqtani Inuit Association (QIA), officially opened Qausuittuq National Park at a ceremony held in the community of Qausuittuq/Resolute Bay.

The Inuit Impact Benefit Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Qikiqtani Inuit Association ensures that Inuit in the region and the community of Qausuittuq/Resolute Bay benefit from the creation of this park today and in the future.

CNW News Release

Youth Friendly Community Recognition Program - Application Deadline Jan 5, 2018

Added on Aug 10, 2017

Is your community one which makes an investment in youth play? Do you want to make sure that youth have access to as many opportunities as possible?  If so, then you will want to apply to be recognized as a Youth Friendly Community. The Program works to acknowledge the great work that some communities are doing in ensuring their youth (ages 13 - 19) have continuous access to a diversity of 'play' (play being anything a young person does in his/her free time which could include: sport, recreation, drama, dance, music, the arts, volunteerism, leadership development, service leadership and/or civic engagement).

This is a community application so work to get youth, service partners and the general public involved with the application process! These groups can help provide examples from places such as libraries, local businesses like bowling alleys or movie theatres, and even community groups like the Scouts and Cadets.

Youth also have the opportunity to participate in the application. Youth can share their opinions and feedback on programs, activities and services they enjoy and can also explain how Youth Friendly they feel their community is.

Health Promotion Canada 2017 Recognition Awards: Deadline Sept 30, 2017

Added on Aug 10, 2017

The inaugural Health Promotion Canada 2017 Recognition Awards offers the opportunity to elevate health promoters at various stages in their careers, and celebrate those who are making significant contributions in the field of health promotion across Canada.

The Nomination Form and two letters of support must be submitted by September 30, 2017 at 11:59 PM PST.

Recipients of the awards will receive a one year complimentary 2018 HPC membership (Lifetime Achievement recipients will receive a complimentary lifetime membership), and be recognized at HPC’s Annual General Meeting on December 7, 2017 and on HPC’s website.

Sport's a life changer for many troubled Indigenous youth, says 2017 Indian Summer Games coach

Added on Aug 9, 2017

For Cathy Ward playing volleyball started as a way out of what could have turned into a troubled life.

"Being involved in sport has saved me from going down the wrong path," said the volleyball coach from Metepenagiag, a First Nation near Miramichi.

Ward said she used to be a troubled teenager on the reserve, until her coach approached her about starting a volleyball team. Today, she works as a public servant with the federal government in Ottawa, while coaching both middle and high school teams back home in Metepenagiag. She says that while it's not always easy to recruit, the lessons the children she can attract to the sport learn stay with them for life. "It's all about honesty, just being the best person you can be in a team environment," she said.

Viola Pruss, CBC News

Pilot project dispenses free sunscreen in Toronto parks

Added on Aug 9, 2017

Two Canadian non-profits teamed up with public health authorities in the City of Toronto to place dispensers in five parks. The dispensers look and work much like hand sanitizer dispensers and are stocked with Health Canada-approved sunscreen. The initiative is based on similar successful programs in parks across the United States, and if the project proves to be successful, an extensive expansion is planned for next summer.

Lynn Desjardins, Radio Canada

Recreation North: Training for New Recreation Leaders

Added on Aug 4, 2017

Recreation North has designed a training program for community recreation leaders. If you live in Yukon, NWT or Nunavut, and work or would like to work or volunteer in recreation, but have little or no formal training or education, this Program is designed for you.

A Pilot of the Program will run from October 2017 to May 2018.

Coaching Association of Canada and Aboriginal Sport Circle Launch Revisions to the Aboriginal Coaching Modules

Added on Aug 3, 2017

To celebrate National Aboriginal Day, the Coaching Association of Canada (CAC) and the Aboriginal Sport Circle (ASC) launched revised versions of the Aboriginal Coaching Modules (ACM). 

The ACM is a professional development training tool for all coaches, whether Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal, who coach Aboriginal athletes. Offered as a workshop through the National Coaching Certification Program (NCCP), its content reflects the uniqueness of Indigenous cultures, values, and lifestyles, and is rolled out in three modules:

  1. Holistic Approach to Coaching;
  2. Dealing with Racism in Sport; and
  3. Individual and Community Health and Wellness.

Recent revisions to the ACM include updates to the definitions and terminology used around the subject of racism, as well as updates to the topics of nutrition, mental health, and influencing change in the community. The revisions also address the calls to action identified by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Gros Morne autism-friendly cabin is first ever for Parks Canada

Added on Jul 31, 2017

As part of adapting one of its rustic cabins at the Berry Hill Campground to make it autism-friendly, Parks Canada worked with the Autism Society of Newfoundland and Labrador and the Autism Involves Me group in Port aux Basques to come up with kits of items that are suitable for people with sensory issues. Francois Duclos, acting visitor experience manager for Gros Morne, says the extra help for people with autism starts at the time of booking, when additional information will be provided to prepare them for their visit.

Duclos said changes include window coverings so the light isn't so harsh and stimulating to someone with autism, "using material, accessories, textures, colours, light, in order to create this environment that will soothe them, that will comfort them, and that will prevent any negative reaction," extra security features such as latches to safeguard against wandering.

Bernice Hillier, CBC News

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