Environmental Benefits

Are you interested in the idea of camping but don’t know where to start? Saskatchewan Parks and our Learn to Camp program can help!

Three ways to learn:Choose an overnight experience at one of three participating parks! We supply all of the camping equipment you will need. You supply your own food, bedding, and personal items (clothing, toiletries, etc).

Wild About Vancouver (WAV) Outdoor Education Festival is a free public festival offering practical ways to get children (and adults) outdoors more regularly. It is open to the public and aims to unite and create long-term sustainable Outdoor and Experiential Learning (OEL) networks for organizations, schools, youth programs, and the broader citizenry (including youth and First Nations) of Vancouver.

The Global Roots Garden is an  intergenerational project in partnership with The Stop Community Food Centre  to learn gardening, cooking and environmental skills.  Youth work with senior newcomers to grow their own community gardens and harvest the vegetables too! Participants also get to learn about nutrition, and get to share healthy recipes and recipes of different cultural origins.

NEAT (Newcomers Explore and Appreciate Toronto) is a very unique program designed to help immigrants/convention refugees to gain hands-on experience in Event Planning. Newcomers are matched with experienced mentors for a period of 4-6 months and work as a team to research, plan and execute free guided tours that are open to the community.

The Wintegration Club creates opportunities for newcomers to enjoy our coldest season, with fun, free and healthy outdoor recreation activities. As one participant told us last year, “Wintegration Club was really joyful and helpful to me and to my family. We, as newcomers, enjoy the events in spite of having such cold weather. In fact I managed to feel the beauty of winter! I never forget the friendly communication between the different groups, amazing activities (esp.

With generous funding from the Ontario Government, ‘Opening Our Streets for Health’gives 8-80 Cities the opportunity to inspire and support the implementation of Open Streets programs in four Ontario municipalities-Kingston, Toronto, Thunder Bay, and Windsor.

Make a Place for People is a component of our Active Places, Healthy People project and is based on the idea that community participation is the key to the creation of vibrant and healthy public spaces. 

The Doable Neighbourhood Project (DNP) is a practical and participatory approach to creating healthier neighbourhoods in Ontario. The goal of the DNP is to improve mental and physical wellbeing by providing community leaders with new tools to assess their neighbourhoods, and by supporting the development of innovative pilot projects.

Mobilized FreeWheelers version 1.0 was an elaboration on our core Build-A-Bike program. The project explored the need for more community-based and locally specific knowledge of cycling and transportation access, based on experiences of young people living in marginalized communities in Toronto.

Past participants of Charlie’s FreeWheels learn on-road safety, get to see more of the city, and they can spend time with new friends.Bike Club has been to Scarborough Bluffs, Leslie Street Spit, the Don Valley Ravine, and to the Toronto Islands. Students typically choose places to go, and a picnic lunch is provided.